Update Coming to Top 200 Drugs List

The Top 200 Drugs memorization games on Study Putty will hopefully be updated with current data before the start of the fall semester for the Pharmacy students out there.

Currently, Study Putty uses Top 200 Drugs data from 2013. This data is presented in memorization games matching trade and generic names, or either name to type of drug.

To see the Top 200 Drugs learning games on Study Putty, click the screen shot below. Continue reading

Naming Polyatomic Ions

How to Name Polyatomic Ions

Here are some simple rules for naming polyatomic ions.

Polyatomic ions with more oxygen atoms will end in -ate, and those with fewer oxygen atoms will end in -ite. When there are more than two polyatomic ions composed of the same elements, the prefix hypo- indicates the least number of oxygen atoms, and the prefix per- will indicate the most oxygen per ion.

Less Oxygen More Oxygen
hypo- -ite -ate per-

Look at the paradigm for chlorine oxyanions below. Continue reading

Memorize Polyatomic Ion Charges — Free Game at Study Putty

How Do You Memorize the Polyatomic Ions’ Charges?

New in our growing list of Study Putty learning games is a game for memorizing the charges of the polyatomic ions. You can test yourself here (match chemical formulas to charges) and here (match names to charges), or visit the Study Putty homepage to see all our topics.

Click the screenshot to play the game!

Buckets Polyatomic Ions Charges

And if you’re just looking for a quick reference, here’s a list of the polyatomic ions, including the charge. Continue reading

PDF Formula Sheet: Geometry–Coordinate Geometry, Shapes, and Solids

Distance Midpoint Formula

The distance formula & the midpoint formula

Looking for a shapes/solids or coordinate geometry formula PDF? You are in the right area, alright. Coordinate your studies with this high volume of formulas.

Three puns of that caliber in row and I’ve found the midpoint of self-loathing.

Geeze, I can’t stop. I’m on a downward…slope. Continue reading

Students: Cram Cranial Nerve Knowledge into Your Cranium

Learn the Cranial Nerves

Store Your A&P’s Intercranially at Study Putty

What do you (or your students) need to learn? Need a memorization game? Let us know.

Cranial Nerve Functions at Study Putty

We now have memorization games to help you study the cranial nerves on Study Putty! Memorize the numbers and functions of each nerve, and also whether each is primarily sensory or primarily motor. Head on over and select either A&P or Nursing and you’re on your way to cranial nerve mastery.

Here are some additional study aids, courtesy of our passion for making cramming less sucky:

The Top Twelve Cranial Nerves of All Time

…presented in order of…their order. Continue reading

Learn the Endocrine System at Study Putty

The StudTake an Endocrine System Siesta

Our memorization suite, Study Putty, is secreting new content all the time. We’ve squeezed our brain-glands in order to produce learning tools on the topic of the oozy ol’ endocrine system.

Here you can memorize the names and locations of the endocrine glands. You can test yourself: given certain organs, what is endocrine and what is exocrine? You can also match important endocrine hormones to the glands that chiefly produce them.

Study Putty Gland Locations

A game of gland locations. Notice only four show at once–hit “new game” for a new set.

Acne and Angst from This Way Come: Endocrine Hormones

If that wasn’t enough cramming for you, there are tools for memorizing Continue reading

Tell Us What You Gotta Cram and We’ll Give It to You Pronto

Let Study Putty Be Your Study Buddy Tonight

It’s a free memorization tool!

If you are a student looking for a new way to memorize the crud you have to cram for class, Study Putty would like to help.

Why do we beat quizzing yourself on that crinkled cheat sheet another twenty-seven times? Why do we top reading the same table in your textbook on endless repeat? (With prospects that thrilling, do I even need to say?) Well, let me tell you. Nay, let me show you. Does your normal way of studying look like this?

Screen shot 2014-02-18 at 11.01.46 AM

Demonstrating our “constructive feedback” feature running in Shakespearean English.

Continue reading