Ionic Bonding Explained (Videos)

A Chemical Bond Breakdown by an Internet Chem Guru

Tyler DeWitt might be the Internet’s favorite chemistry teacher–well, after Walter White and Bill Nye the Science Guy. The reason why he’s up there on the list anyway has to do with his point-by-point, easy-to-follow, visually-oriented explanations of the very threshold concepts that students struggle with. The following is the first installment in his video series on ionic bonding. See his channel for the whole series, and for a myriad of other topics.

As you see, Mr. DeWitt reaches out to young students with a two-camera, straightforward approach, and a 30-year-old’s best imitation of a 16-year-old’s dress sense. But watch all three of these and you might just understand some chemistry.

Isn’t It Ionic, Don’tcha Think?

If the difference between covalent and ionic bonds is still fuzzy, here’s a video from another source, Mr. Anderson of Bozeman High School in Bozeman, MT. Mr. Anderson explains the Octet Rule using a metaphor of vintage Star Wars toys. Learn how to use electronegativity to judge ionic from covalent bonds. Is C3PO ionic or covalent?

If you could get through the video without hearing echoes of Agent Smith from the Matrix, congratulations.

“Do you hear that, Mr. Anderson? It is the sound of electronegativity.”–Agent Smith, The Matrix.

Dogs Teaching Chemistry

If you just can’t get chemical bonding when it’s being explained by a human being with a college degree, how ’bout getting a lesson from dogs? Personally, I need an instructor to teach to my level. My level is approximately that of dog IQ. Now I always play “ionic bonding” and “covalent bonding” with my rope-toys at home. (And I don’t even own a dog!)

Other Chemistry Resources We’ve Collected:

Polyatomic Ions – Memorization

Lewis-Dot Diagrams

Dimensional Analysis

About Bret Norwood

Bret Norwood is a staff blogger for Learning Laboratory in addition to other roles, including UI design and content development for Study Putty, our free memorization tool for chemistry and many other course topics. He is also a published writer of literary fiction–see BretNorwood.com

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