Watch Metal Crystals Grow — BeautifulChemistry.net

Beautiful Chemistry

Zn + Pb(NO3)2 –> Pb + Zn(NO3)2, etc.

Want to see something metal? What could be more brutally metal than “lead trees”? Yes, trees of actual lead. A forest of them. And they are chillingly majestic. Granted, they’re tiny and in a solution, but I’m going to overlook that fact.

From BeautifulChemistry.net

 

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Ionic Bonding Explained (Videos)

A Chemical Bond Breakdown by an Internet Chem Guru

Tyler DeWitt might be the Internet’s favorite chemistry teacher–well, after Walter White and Bill Nye the Science Guy. The reason why he’s up there on the list anyway has to do with his point-by-point, easy-to-follow, visually-oriented explanations of the very threshold concepts that students struggle with. The following is the first installment in his video series on ionic bonding. See his channel for the whole series, and for a myriad of other topics.

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Dimensional Analysis Made Easy

How much wood could a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck 557 kilograms per hour, in an eight hour work day. Give answer in megatonnes.

How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck 15.5 kilograms per minute in an eight hour work day? Give answer in megatonnes.

Dimensional analysis is not the first thing Mr. Spock does when the Starship Enterprise accidentally travels into a new universe or timeline. That is not what we’re here to learn about today.

Unfortunately. Because that sounds interesting.

Instead, we have what is also commonly called “the factor-label method” and simply “unit conversion.” Dimensional analysis is the method that is used to get an answer in the correct units of measurement in problems relating to math, chemistry, and other physical sciences. At its most simple, it can be solving how many minutes are in two hours, or, on the more complex end, it can be finding how many moles there are in three cubic meters of argon.

So are you stuck on your homework? We’ve assembled a few resources to help you with the factor label method. Continue reading

Lewis Dot Learning Resources

Lewis structure for Water

Whether you are a student, trying to master the drawing of Lewis Dot (aka electron dot or electron structure) diagrams for the first time, or a teacher, trying to find some resources to spice up or reinforce your classroom lectures, a lack of Google search results is likely not your problem!  Depending on your search terms, you may get 1,000,000 hits.  With so much information, how do you filter through the results (or even the first page or two) and find exactly what you are looking for without wasting all of your study or class prep-time trying to narrow them down?

That is where we come in. The purpose of this page is to give you a helping hand in finding the best Lewis Dot resources. We’ve identified what we believe are some of the best examples of written, video and learning activities for learning Lewis structures. Each resource type has the potential to improve learning about Lewis dot diagrams in a different way depending on your teaching or learning style and/or students’ needs. Your reactions may be different — so if you disagree with our assessments or think we’ve missed a hidden gem, please leave a comment and share the Lewis dot love, so to speak. Continue reading