Watch Metal Crystals Grow — BeautifulChemistry.net

Beautiful Chemistry

Zn + Pb(NO3)2 –> Pb + Zn(NO3)2, etc.

Want to see something metal? What could be more brutally metal than “lead trees”? Yes, trees of actual lead. A forest of them. And they are chillingly majestic. Granted, they’re tiny and in a solution, but I’m going to overlook that fact.

From BeautifulChemistry.net

 

Study Chemistry with Study PuttyWhere the cool kids go to scrape by on tests.

Atomic Orbital Mnemonic Devices–with Illustrations, and Raditude

Atomic Orbital Mnemonics

How does one remember SPDFGHIK…? Remembering the S through K orbitals is the trick. After K, it goes alphabetical. (But skipping S and P, because they’ve already been done.) My search for atomic orbital mnemonic devices only turned up one that had sufficient character to stick those eight seemingly arbitrary letters in my mind.

The Standard Mnemonic

The one I found was pretty good, though:

Sober Physicists Don’t Find Giraffes Hiding IKitchens.

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How to Find Free Images for Educational Use

1000px-Periodic_Table_of_Elements_showing_Electron_Shells_(2011_version).svgby Greg Robson, via Wikimedia. Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike.

Copyright Law and Images for Educational Use

135px-AX9E0-3D-balls

Click any image in this post to see its source and open license information.

It’s not difficult to find images for your classroom and teaching materials while honoring copyright law. There are a number of ways to find free or open-license images on the Internet. While there is such a thing as the fair use of copyrighted images for educational use, this use is fairly restrictive and requires your time and effort to ensure you’ve complied. Unless a specific image you need is a copyrighted resource, your time may serve you better to search for free or properly licensed images. Here are three safe and easy ways to find an image you can be certain you have license to use. Continue reading

Naming Polyatomic Ions

How to Name Polyatomic Ions

Here are some simple rules for naming polyatomic ions.

Polyatomic ions with more oxygen atoms will end in -ate, and those with fewer oxygen atoms will end in -ite. When there are more than two polyatomic ions composed of the same elements, the prefix hypo- indicates the least number of oxygen atoms, and the prefix per- will indicate the most oxygen per ion.

Less Oxygen More Oxygen
hypo- -ite -ate per-

Look at the paradigm for chlorine oxyanions below. Continue reading

How to Make an Oppia Exploration (Ed Tech Reviews)

Welcome graphic from Oppia.org

What is Oppia? Find out about Oppia.org in my previous post, Oppia: Opportunity for Progressive Learning or Open-Content Muddle?

Creating the Dimensional Analysis Exploration

As I left off in my last post, I tried out Oppia.org by creating an exploration called “Dimensional Analysis for Chemistry.” In short, while the creation process is a little laborious depending on the complexity of the exploration, I was rather pleased with the content creation tools. In particular, I was impressed by the powerful options for setting the feedback rules for user responses. In my opinion, Oppia may have a place in a teacher’s tool belt–or it can just become a creative hobby. Here’s the good and the…almost good, to consider when you look at Oppia.org. Continue reading

Memorize Polyatomic Ion Charges — Free Game at Study Putty

How Do You Memorize the Polyatomic Ions’ Charges?

New in our growing list of Study Putty learning games is a game for memorizing the charges of the polyatomic ions. You can test yourself here (match chemical formulas to charges) and here (match names to charges), or visit the Study Putty homepage to see all our topics.

Click the screenshot to play the game!

Buckets Polyatomic Ions Charges

And if you’re just looking for a quick reference, here’s a list of the polyatomic ions, including the charge. Continue reading

Tell Us What You Gotta Cram and We’ll Give It to You Pronto

Let Study Putty Be Your Study Buddy Tonight

It’s a free memorization tool!

If you are a student looking for a new way to memorize the crud you have to cram for class, Study Putty would like to help.

Why do we beat quizzing yourself on that crinkled cheat sheet another twenty-seven times? Why do we top reading the same table in your textbook on endless repeat? (With prospects that thrilling, do I even need to say?) Well, let me tell you. Nay, let me show you. Does your normal way of studying look like this?

Screen shot 2014-02-18 at 11.01.46 AM

Demonstrating our “constructive feedback” feature running in Shakespearean English.

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15+ Free Games to Memorize the Periodic Table of Elements

Master the Mother of All Charts

Content requests? Or are you interested in developing custom learning tools for your classroom? Contact us!

Where the cool kids go to scrape by on tests.

Periodic table stock in this graphic by Wikipedia user DePeip. CC3.0 Attribution/Share-alike.

Visit our project StudyPutty.com to use our awesome memorization tools. It’s free and it’s a change of pace from quizzing yourself on that crumpled-up cheat sheet for the twenty billionth time, for the love of Gallium. Click the logo below to go there now! Continue reading